Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

Journal

Embodied Rituals for Skin + Soul

Filtering by Tag: self-care

Wild Woman Hair Serum

Katie Gordon

It took me a loooooooong time to embrace my wild, out of control, thick, curly hair. I used to actually cry because I didn't have "normal" straight hair like most of my friends when I was little. Throughout high school and college I either straightened it or just threw it up because I didn't know what to do with it or even how to take care of it.

After trying out SO MANY products - supposedly for curly hair - and years of frustrated, wanting-to-pull-my-hair-out moments, I eventually learned what my hair needs to be healthy (i.e. curly sans frizz). So even though it's still crazy, in the best way possible, my hair's now softer curls rather than dry and frizzy. It's becoming more common knowledge now that our hair, and the rest of our skin for that matter, needs oil just like our bodies need fat. Curly hair especially needs A LOT of oil because it's naturally drier and because of that it's more prone to breakage which leads to even more frizz. In order to care for our locks we need to nourish it with oils that not only smooth our hair but also repair damage that happens as a result of everyday elements (wind, heat, water, etc.)

When I first started adding oils to my morning ritual (yes, getting ready is a ritual) I was worried it would leave my hair greasy or weighed down, but my hair literally drinks this stuff up! This combination of oils is my favorite...and it's not an exaggeration to say it has changed the way I relate to my hair.

For women who run with the wolves...

Some of my other favorite essential oils, are rosemary, jasmine, lavender, cedarwood, peppermint, bergamot, and sage. Think fresh and perhaps a bit floral. I get all of my ingredients from Mountain Rose Herbs because I know I'm getting the highest quality organic oils and herbs.

In a small mason jar, blend your carrier oils and give it a little swirl. Then add your essential oils, if you're using them. This is when you can get creative and play with different scents and combinations of oils. Once you're happy with your oil, use a little funnel if you have one to pour your serum into a 2 oz. bottle. I use a dropper bottle because it looks cool and it keeps your bottle from getting oily when you use it. Make sure to label it in some way! I generally find that if things aren't labeled, I won't use them because I forget what it is.

To use your hair serum, rub a few drops between your palms, flip your hair upside down, and "scrunch" your hair from the ends with your oily hands. I find doing it this way keeps the roots from feeling too oily and it adds enough moisture to all of my hair to keep it curly and not frizzy. If you have thick hair don't be afraid to use a whole dropperful of oil. It's like a leave-in conditioner and your hair will love you for it!

Disclosure: Wild Grace uses affiliate campaigns from Mountain Rose Herbs that may be displayed as text links or images such as banners, buttons and widgets.  When you click on these affiliate program links and make a purchase, a very small commission may be credited to Wild Grace.  The commission that I receive is very small and helps me to defray the cost of buying ingredients to craft skin + body care recipes.  When you do make a purchase using my Mountain Rose Herbs affiliate link, your purchase is the same price you would pay if you went directly to MountainRoseHerbs.com.  I sincerely appreciate your support and if you plan to purchase something anyway, I would be truly grateful if you did so through my affiliate link to Mountain Rose Herbs.

Evolving yoga & the bodysoul

Katie Gordon

A friend and I were walking and talking the other day about how, as teachers, both our yoga practice and the way we approach teaching has evolved. I came to yoga during college after leaving ballet. I had struggled with bulimia and anorexia for years, but even more than that, I felt mentally, emotionally, and physically rigid. I was stuck in this foreign body that I had numbed and quieted for so long, I no longer knew how to hear the voice of my soul or feel my physical body enough to even know when something was wrong. So I stumbled/dragged myself into a yoga studio around the corner from my apartment in Boston's Back Bay, started teaching awhile later, and discovered a world I saw as completely opposite from my rigid, extreme, self-loathing reality. And unlike the pain and exhaustion of ballet, I had found something that made me feel literally high afterward. Plus it's healthy (both physically and mentally), it's great exercise (they don't call it a yoga butt for nothing), and I felt good about myself as a person, justified in my somewhat-self-righteous approach to the yoga-raw food-vegan-sattvic-clean-eating lifestyle because I'm doing something "of value" and teaching people how to feel better, right? Now I see all I had done was carry that same rigidity, the same self-imposed rules into a new setting.

And then I got disillusioned with the whole thing. I got bored. I got injured. I wasn't down with paying $100 for a pair of yoga pants. I got tired of feeling burnt out after teaching SO much and struggling to pay my bills. Seriously, if you want to be a "successful" yoga teacher (and they're out there!) you gotta hustle. You gotta have passion. And I didn't. My body hurt, I could barely make rent, I didn't even have the time or energy or desire to maintain my own practice. So I said f*ck this.

I gave up trying to survive by teaching and I got a "real job." You know the whole work 9-5, wear "professional" clothes, get a paycheck every 2 weeks, have health insurance, work in an office kinda job. This was that stage in my practice when I was so happy to NOT stress out about money/survival/my-family-thinks-I'm-a-total-failure that you'll do anything for this new job. And don't get me wrong, the company I worked for is GREAT! They treat their employees better than any I've seen. The people there are wonderful. But my connection to my wild soul was fading. And my physical body was like, "How can you possibly have a job where you're sitting at a computer all day??!! Have I taught you nothing??"

During this time my practice taught me to slow down. Because of injuries, I couldn't do everything I used to be able to do. I had to be super mindful, take my time, and listen to my body in a way I never have. I felt like because I no longer had to depend on yoga to make a living, I could make it all about me. What I needed, wanted, craved in terms of movement. How my bodysoul needed to manifest herself. And through that work, it became increasingly clear that, even though I was comfortable & happy enough, I wasn't living my full truth or my soul's purpose in the world.

So when the opportunity arrived, I left. I moved to the Pacific Northwest, where I'd wanted to live since I was a kid (after watching The Goonies. Because pirate caves.) and where I could focus solely on my little business. And since Wild Grace is an extension of me, it became VERY clear that to have an abundant business, I needed to cultivate a healthier mind-body-soul connection. For me, even though I hated to admit it for awhile, the way in to that connection was through my yoga practice. It forced me to sit, breathe, be, and listen. It showed me how to deeply honor my body when I was practicing honestly and from a place of love for myself.

As I was preparing to teach a demo class in my new home town, I realized my yoga practice and what it meant to me had changed because my relationship with my body had changed. Because of the way I used to practice, always pushing myself, forcing myself further into poses, to keep going even if practicing didn't feel good or if I was hurt, my body had finally had enough and my practice HAD to change.

You're probably thinking, "Well, duh!" But really, I could finally see clearly how the way I felt in my body, the way I surrendered to my body, the way I saw it, felt it, heard it. The way I allowed it space. The way I honored the open spaces and the tense, closed, traumatized spaces had shifted in each stage of both my ego & soul growth. And because of that I was finally allowing my body to evolve rather than stay within a "safe" range of weight and shape. I was allowing my soul to expand, to be her brilliant & bright self. Where there was once a major disconnect between my soul's desire for compassion and self-love and my mind's need for some semblance of control, now there's just (for the most part) quiet, space, and a deep honoring of the way it sometimes all has to play out so that we can actually learn how to get out of our own way and meaningfully make something of ourselves.

And so I guess when you can finally let go of your opinion of the yoga industry, your fear of not being "good enough," the constant need to compare yourself as a teacher and student, and the competition for classes, all that's left is your relationship to your body (physical and energetic) and the practice of showing up each day to be with yourself.

Why I dress up to work at home...

Katie Gordon

Photo by Cori Barnick

Here's a little known fact about me - When I was a kid, I was ALWAYS dressed up.  I refused to wear pants or shorts until I was 6 years old (at which point I went to a school with a uniform consisting of polo shirts and navy blue shorts...not cute).  I had more than one pair of sparkly red shoes at any given time and I only wore dresses with skirts that went out flat when you twirled around.  I had a bow or ribbon to match every outfit.  I wore ruffly socks (obviously).  I showed up to one of my mom's parties in a green and gold sparkly tutu.  You get the idea.  Maybe it's the Leo in me that at some level loves to be the center of attention, or maybe it's just that I've always liked shiny, sparkly things that stand out.

At some point, I decided dressing up was a waste of time.  I figured there are so many things that are more important than clothes and how someone looks.  We shouldn't judge people by their appearance anyway, right?  Plus nice clothes are expensive!  So when I first started working more from home or seeing bodywork clients I thought, "This is great!  I can stay in PJ's or yoga pants all day, I don't have to wear shoes, put on make up or do my hair!"  BUT I also get much less done, I feel frumpy, disconnected and distracted, out of my flow, and like the day never really starts.  Not to mention that I have SO MUCH make up (I go through a phase every year, usually around this time, where I get semi-obsessed with Sephora), and I'm still a sucker for cute dresses.  It's made me realize something that I already knew back when I was 5 -- putting time and effort into anything sends a signal to our spirit that whatever that thing is, it's special, valuable, true, and worth our time and effort.

It's not about materialism, or needing to have stuff to make us feel good, or valuing ourselves based on our appearance.  It IS about allowing yourself to feel what/how you want to feel, creating space and getting inspired to do the work you're on this earth to do by taking your time, and taking care with yourself.  Don't get me wrong, we all need those days where we stay in our jammies, watch movies, lounge under the covers, and give ourselves space from the outside world.   How might it feel, though, for those of us who work at home or in a more casual environment, to put that effort into how we show up for ourselves?  What message does it send to ourselves when we approach our morning routine with playfulness rather than the "whatever no one's gonna see me today anyway" attitude?